Latitude 0 – Longitude 0

Today was our tourist day where we visited two local churches for services and than moved on to Mitad Del Mundo (the center of the world). The two church services were a lot of fun and a blessing to be a part of. There was LOTS of singing and clapping and a little jumping around but was a neat experience. We also took communion at the second church we visited where I nearly choked on the “wine” or what represented the blood of Christ for those who don’t know. We’re still not sure what type of alcohol it was but some thought it was Sherry (spelling?).
After the church services, we had a 30 minute drive to the other side of Quito to Mitad Del Mundo. The traffic, the fumes, and the bus driver combined to make me ill so I was extremely relieved when we got off the bus. The first thing I noticed upon exit was the faces of other Caucasians. We actually ran into a family from Iowa while we were there. There seemed to be a lot of German tourists as well.
We ate a place called Yavati’s where we all were served a beef dish I don’t know the name of but it wasn’t tremendously appetizing when you already felt ill. It made me crave Quizno’s of all places and things, I have no idea why! :) After we finished our meals, Paul brought us a traditional Ecuadorean dish called “Cuy”. For those of you who don’t know or own a pet hamster of some sort, Cuy is roast guinea pig. We all gave it a shot and although it was very stringy (and they didn’t remove the jaw or teeth) it wasn’t that bad. I can’t say it compares to any other meat I’ve had and I certainly wouldn’t eat it again, but it wasn’t horrible, as long as you didn’t look at it from the face on…or as long as you didn’t recall the two pet hamsters (Winston and JJ) that you had growing up!
We shopped for about an hour at all the little shops around the Equator monument. Most of the shops carried the same items but everything was CHEAP! I bought lots of things, more than I expected to get and spent less than $60. You are able to bargain for items but there is really no need when everything is less than $10. I bought a hammock and I don’t even have anything I can attach it to, it was handmade and $9!
The actual Equator monument is a huge obelisk type of granite structure with a large globe on the top and the Cardinal directions on each of its four sides. There is a sign (put there strictly for the tourists I’m sure) that is just in front of the East side of the monument that says “Equator – Latitude 0 Longitude 0″. There was also the North/South Hemisphere line that is drawn in red across the entire pavement of the monument. Lots of pictures in both those areas of course. What most people don’t know is that that red line and granite monument is geographically off by several hundred feet. The real Equator line is several hundred feet to the South but there is little fanfare surrounding that monument. It also costs an extra couple of bucks to see the “real” Equator monument.
An overall fun day, we returned to the dorm and had Domino’s pizza, attempted to re-pack to include our souvenirs and were de-briefed by Paul, Susan, and Mike from Extreme Response. Again, tears were shed as everyone shared the joys of the experience and what kind of work we saw God do here in Ecuador not only with the family we built the house for but with our team.
Now all we have left is to safely make it through customs in the Quito airport and hope they don’t find something they like in our carry-ons and remove them. I have packed all my souvenirs (but my hammock!) in my carry-on so as not to run the risk of something being broken. We have to make it through customs, security, and pay an exit fee to leave the country ($40.85) and we’re off to Miami.
Please expect a final blog when I get back into the office this week as well as photos fromt he trip.

Latitude 0 – Longitude 0

Today was our tourist day where we visited two local churches for services and than moved on to Mitad Del Mundo (the center of the world). The two church services were a lot of fun and a blessing to be a part of. There was LOTS of singing and clapping and a little jumping around but was a neat experience. We also took communion at the second church we visited where I nearly choked on the “wine” or what represented the blood of Christ for those who don’t know. We’re still not sure what type of alcohol it was but some thought it was Sherry (spelling?).
After the church services, we had a 30 minute drive to the other side of Quito to Mitad Del Mundo. The traffic, the fumes, and the bus driver combined to make me ill so I was extremely relieved when we got off the bus. The first thing I noticed upon exit was the faces of other Caucasians. We actually ran into a family from Iowa while we were there. There seemed to be a lot of German tourists as well.
We ate a place called Yavati’s where we all were served a beef dish I don’t know the name of but it wasn’t tremendously appetizing when you already felt ill. It made me crave Quizno’s of all places and things, I have no idea why! :) After we finished our meals, Paul brought us a traditional Ecuadorean dish called “Cuy”. For those of you who don’t know or own a pet hamster of some sort, Cuy is roast guinea pig. We all gave it a shot and although it was very stringy (and they didn’t remove the jaw or teeth) it wasn’t that bad. I can’t say it compares to any other meat I’ve had and I certainly wouldn’t eat it again, but it wasn’t horrible, as long as you didn’t look at it from the face on…or as long as you didn’t recall the two pet hamsters (Winston and JJ) that you had growing up!
We shopped for about an hour at all the little shops around the Equator monument. Most of the shops carried the same items but everything was CHEAP! I bought lots of things, more than I expected to get and spent less than $60. You are able to bargain for items but there is really no need when everything is less than $10. I bought a hammock and I don’t even have anything I can attach it to, it was handmade and $9!
The actual Equator monument is a huge obelisk type of granite structure with a large globe on the top and the Cardinal directions on each of its four sides. There is a sign (put there strictly for the tourists I’m sure) that is just in front of the East side of the monument that says “Equator – Latitude 0 Longitude 0″. There was also the North/South Hemisphere line that is drawn in red across the entire pavement of the monument. Lots of pictures in both those areas of course. What most people don’t know is that that red line and granite monument is geographically off by several hundred feet. The real Equator line is several hundred feet to the South but there is little fanfare surrounding that monument. It also costs an extra couple of bucks to see the “real” Equator monument.
An overall fun day, we returned to the dorm and had Domino’s pizza, attempted to re-pack to include our souvenirs and were de-briefed by Paul, Susan, and Mike from Extreme Response. Again, tears were shed as everyone shared the joys of the experience and what kind of work we saw God do here in Ecuador not only with the family we built the house for but with our team.
Now all we have left is to safely make it through customs in the Quito airport and hope they don’t find something they like in our carry-ons and remove them. I have packed all my souvenirs (but my hammock!) in my carry-on so as not to run the risk of something being broken. We have to make it through customs, security, and pay an exit fee to leave the country ($40.85) and we’re off to Miami.
Please expect a final blog when I get back into the office this week as well as photos fromt he trip.

Bienvenidos Su Casa!

Well today was the big day for the team and Gloria and her family. We woke up early again today to get out to the work site to make sure we had everything done. The family was told not to come to the house until around noon so we had a few hours to finish a few things and clean up. The countertop in the kitchen was finished, the girls did a lot of the painting, the bathroom was finished and we did a LOT of cleaning. The house is cinderblock and mortar so the dust and chunks of concrete made up most of what we had to clean up. We also set up each of the three rooms. Grandma Maria and Gloria had their own rooms while the five girls shared a large back bedroom with bunk beds. Each bed had a colorful sheet set and comforter and each family member had their own shelf space and new sets of clothes. The girls also got new backpacks, school supplies, shoes (a commodity), and some other fun items like hair ties and toys.
As we were getting the house ready, Tiffany (my roommate on the trip) and I were outside the house when we heard gunshots. We heard them several times before we decided to investigate (smart right?). We walked around the corner of the house and saw a very long parade of people going through Gloria’s small town dressed in traditional costumes and following a brass band. We went to take some pictures and later asked what that was. It was a Saint moving parade. They literally moved a Saint statue from one place to another. We ran into Gloria while we were exploring the parade and she told us to follow her. We could finally see the front of the parade line and they were carrying a large wooden box with the Saint statue inside. It was interesting to be a part of although the townspeople were looking at us a bit funny for being in their parade.
Anyway, the time came for the family to see the house. Jose, the pastor in Quito blessed the house in Spanish and our group said a prayer in English. We then released the girls to see the rest of the house. Elizabet, the oldest of the girls at 15 was overwhelmed even before we showed her the house. Gloria and Grandma Maria thanked us and prayed that God’s blessings would be returned to us ten times over. It was all very moving and there were lots of happy tears.
I do believe Gloria’s favorite part of the house was the nearly fully furnished kitchen. Some of the men had to teach Gloria how to use the stove and what exactly to do with the refrigerator as she had not used those before. Ecuadoreans do not refrigerate their milk or eggs. The girls  were beside themselves at their room. They immediately began climbing all over their beds and jumping on their new mattresses. Elizabet of course was crying profusely which made everyone else cry.
We ate a quick dinner with the family and said our goodbyes. It was difficult as we’d grown to love this family and especially the little girls. They are happy, sweet girls and full of energy. I will miss them.
After the house, we had some time to go visit Old Quito where many of their small shops, churches and the Presidential Palace are. You can tell it is the old part of the city as the streets were incredibly narrow and as bad as traffic is anyway, it was quite an experience. We stopped first at Quito’s most famous church, the National Basilica, built in the 1400′s if I’m not mistaken. It was beautiful of course. We saw several other churches that looked much the same but on a smaller scale. All the churches we visited had the same life-like, full-size replica of Jesus Christ in a posture of pain and suffering as he is dying on the cross. It was all very dramatic and as I said, life-like and kind of creepy. But the churches of course were beautiful although we didn’t get to see a whole lot of each of them as it was Mass time in the city.
Dinner was at the Quito mall. Very modern with stores like Diesel, Tommy Hilfiger, and Fossil. There were also a lot of other stores that I had never heard of but everything was hugely overpriced and I didn’t buy a thing. However I did go into one store and saw a cosmetic case that was cute. I said to the lady “Quando cuesta?” (how much is this?) and she told me it was four dollars. I looked around a bit longer and when I took it up to the register, she told me my total was ten dollars. Long story short, Susan from Extreme Response said that was what she called the gringo tax! Food is extremely cheap but clothes, shoes and handbags are expensive here.
Tomorrow is our touristy day. We will visit Mitad Del Mundo (the equator) and do some shopping at the markets up there. We will also visit several church services in the area.
When I return to the states, I will try to upload some photos of the trip so you can see what I’ve been talking about during these days.

Buenos noches!

Hard at Work…

Day three has seen a lot accomplished on the house we came here to build. As of today (day three of work) the outside walls are up and most of the inside walls. Ricardo (our Ecuadorean contractor) came to put in the windows and two front doors. The house is coming along nicely. Gloria and her girls are so excited. When the frame of the house was finished she told Paul, our Extreme Response guide, that it was beautiful. The little girls apparently are so most excited about the shower. Little do Gloria, Maria and the girls know that not only are we building the house, we are fully furnishing it with appliances, beds and mattresses, furniture, dishes and other supplies. Gloria is only expecting the house itself. “Extreme Home Makeover”. We are looking very forward to that.

Other than working on the house, we have not had a whole lot of time out in the city. We have had dinner out twice and homemade dinner once. Our second meal was at the dorm where the housekeeper and her sister made us all an incredible dish. They had a beef item that had marinated for two days and was grilled for two hours. I don’t know the spanish name of it but the literal translation was “prime cut beef”. There was also an au gratin potato like dish called “yapanachos”. If you cover the beef with “aji” it is wonderful. Aji is like a thin salsa but made from a tree tomato and a spice called aji. I had been concerned about how the food here was going to treat me but it has all been wonderful. We did have chinese food tonight which tasted no different than American Chinese food.

There are some interesting things about Ecuador that should be noted. Number one: Do not drink the water, brush your teeth with the water or even get the water in your mouth while showering. I have no idea what the consequences are but since there are signs posted in bathrooms not to come in contact with the water, I will adhere to the advice. Also, toilet paper must not be thrown into the toilet. It must be thrown into the trash cans. Not pleasant but necessary. I only know this next one since we’re doing construction but homeowners must pay property taxes on finished homes. To get around this, people building homes leave several inches of rebar sticking out the corners of their houses so that the home is considered unfinished. Driving in Quito is interesting (terrifying). Red lights are more like guidelines, lane lines are non-existent and if you are not assertive in your driving, you will remained parked in your driveway forever. Horns are constantly honking and it seems as if accidents should be happening every ten seconds. We have managed to avoid accidents but there have been several times where we’ve flinched at how close we’ve come to getting sideswiped. It’s interesting.

The work is hard but the finished business will be worth the effort, aches and pains. We’re halfway through construction and I, at least, am quite proud of us as a team on the progress we’ve made. We can’t wait to show the family.

Until next time…

Day One

Well we’re alive, we’re safe and we’re not in an Ecuadorean jail. We began our quest to Quito, Ecuador by spending several hours in various airports as two of our three flights were delayed. Our plane in Omaha hit a bird before they got to the airport and had some mechanical issues. We made it to Chicago and basically ran to meet our connection to Miami. Upon arrival in Miami, we were delayed by thunderstorms, jetway failures and a failure to locate our flight crew. We left Miami at the stroke of 10 pm (on a flight that was scheduled to leave at 6:50 pm).

We arrived in Quito at 2 am Nebraska time and proceeded to customs. Customs was a breeze but we were a bit nervous about collecting our extra 30 bags of supplies from the luggage carousel. I was told strictly to keep an eye on our bags at the risk of them being confiscated. A lot of the supplies and gifts we were bringing are illegal to bring into the country for resale. We weren’t going to resell any of the items of course but we didn’t want to run any risks.

We managed to pass through the rest of security without incident and was met by Paul, our group leader who lives here in Ecuador. He is with Extreme Response, the group we were to be working with on this trip.

After a brief and speedy bus trip through downtown Quito we arrived at our aaccomodations which was the Extreme Response offices. After a busy day, we went right to sleep.

This morning was the official beginning of our Quito adventures. It began with breakfast, debriefing, and a lunch packing. We piled into a van and headed to our worksite to meet our beneficiaries.

The daylight tour of Quito was much more interesting. Much better when you’re not looking through the haze of dry contacts and lack of sleep. Quito, geographically is beautiful. Our window from our dorm faces east. There are three (currently) dormant volcanoes including Cotopaxi which is extremely large and still snow-capped. 

Over 60% of Ecuador’s populations is below the poverty line and it is terribly evident as you drive through Quito. Trash everywhere and ramshackle buildings and houses. Evidently today, Ecuador passed a new Constitution. It is supposed to make the country more democratic but Paul says it seems very Communist with the Ecuadorean President having most of the power. The people seem to support him.

Quito is extraordinarily hilly and covered in Eucalyptus trees and housing. Where there is any sort of space on the hillsides, a highrise living apartment is built. Driving in the city reminds me of Europe as everyone seems to drive as if in a frantic hurry and there is no fear of the horn.

We twisted and turned eventually ended up at our worksite. The family we were building for was there to greet us and they incredibly sweet people. Very excited we were there. We had introductions with the family who thanked us profusely and we set to work.

I’m not much of a construction buff but I will say, I can mortar one heck of a brick wall. For my first construction experience, I hauled concrete blocks, shoveled and mixed cement and mortared bricks. I enjoy manual labor from time to time and this was probably the most difficult I’ve done.

I got to hang out with the little girls in the family and experimented with what little spanish I knew. The girls are adorable. They range in ages from 3 to 15 and they have boundless energy. Although they are considered extremely poor, even in Ecuadorean society, they are happy people. They have their health, an income and they have each other. As we were laying bricks and mixing concrete, the mother of the family, Gloria was in the thick of things. Physically she was doing things some of the men couldn’t do and she worked extremely hard the entire time we were there. I admire her strength and am astonished at her physicaly capabilities being 36 years old and a tiny woman at about 5’3. I am honored to work with her.

After our work day we visited the daycare we were also providing assistance too. What a wonderful experience! The children were so excited to see us. We gave them little gifts that included tiny stuffed animals and a tennis ball which evidently is a commodity here. I also got to give them some of the youth baseball gloves which the kids seemed to enjoy and pick up the basic idea of catch fairly quickly. Although they thought you had to throw the ball with the gloved hand as well! None of the kids wanted us to leave.

We also took a tour of the city dump where Gloria is employed. What a sight. Adults and teenagers alive sifting through a massive dump site looking for recyclables. The dump work is considered extremely lowly and workers make about 45 dollars a week for 10 hour days. It was humbling.

For dinner, we had reservations for a restaurant aptly named, Cafeteria. I didn’t know what to expect but the food was wonderful. We started with pure passion fruit juice, potato soup with avocado and a main course of chicken with a mushroom creme sauce, steamed vegetables, white rice and a potato with cheese. Evidently, Ecuadoreans love their cheese. You can order hot chocoloate with mozarella cheese. Our fruit cobbler dessert had chunks of cheese in it. Interesting!

Things are quiet now this evening as everyone is wrapping up for the day, journaling, reading and snacking on some of the wonderful “Waferitas” they have here at the dorm. Tomorrow is another full day of construction and we are all exhausted. I feel like I’ve already been here several days but having a great time so far.

Hasta Manana!

A Summer of Baseball

   Well the 2008 season has come and gone just like that!  It seems like I was just starting back in January and learning the ropes of how a Minor League Baseball team was ran and learning the in’s and out’s that come along with baseball.  Well I can tell you that after a season of learning and experiencing new and exciting things, that this has been one of the most enjoyable times of my life.  Thinking that I would just be that intern that would pick up the trash, be told to go clean the toilets and the usual things that go along with a rookie or intern, those were not my duties.  I was thrown right into the mix and had to learn from the start to get things done quickly and done with skill.  Becoming part of the Royals marketing department at the heart of selling season and experiencing the things involved during that time was something that I will take with me into my next job.  The fast pace was not a problem for me and in contrast I really enjoyed it.  I was tested on getting multiple jobs done quickly and still being responsible for other tasks at the same time.  I have learned that Minor League Baseball is not just about baseball, but also about the fans that come out to be entertained and have a fun time at the ballpark.  The sport of baseball will always be the same, but the things that fans remember are the experiences at the ballpark.

   I can say that I have gained a new love for working and creating publications and material that people can view and utilize for their own purpose.  I have done many things this season that I thought I would have just helped out with, not actually create from scratch and see the actual product.  Things like the Fan Favorite collector figurines that were handed out this season.  To create the box that thousands of fans get and for me to possibly see in the future and be able to say I created is a cool thing.  Other things such as pocket schedules which I see around Omaha all the time in gas stations, stores and shops, and again to say I created them, it is just awesome.  My family likes to collect antiques and be pack rats and I believe that is where I get my love and inspiration for creating such things as program covers, pocket schedules, flyers, billboards, etc.  They are something that I can store away for years and when my children stumble across them, I can re-live the experiences of creating them and the great time I had at that time.

   With that I would like to thank the Omaha Royals and everyone that is associated with them, such as the ground crew, concession workers, Rosenblatt Stadium employees and everyone that I had the pleasure to work with while I was here.  I can honestly say that I have gained numerous amounts of new friends and will have connections that will help me in the future.  I could not write this without saying thank you to Rob Crain, who was probably looking for a good laugh when he came across a resume from Ty Cobb.  He has been great to me and has taught me things that I could not have learned from anyone else, like speaking in a Boston accent!  I have had so much fun working for the Omaha Royals and have learned a lot of things that I believe have prepared me for the future.  I will benefit from the things I had have done here and the people that have influenced me.

   To me thinking this was going to be a bit-your-lip and get through it season, to one of blown away expectations, such as creating things for a Triple-A baseball franchise has been a great story.  Having my own baseball promotion and it becoming such a hit around the country with me being interviewed by ESPN, being in ESPN The Magazine and having my own baseball card, just today it hit me that I am lucky to be in this place.  I can remember searching and wondering if I was going to have a job this time last year, and for me to be in this spot now, I could not ask for anything more.  So thank you to all my fans that have kept up with my slow-paced blog and the fans that stop me in the ballpark and want to know a little more about my name, to the Royals staff, you are all my friends and I thank you for the time and memories from this past season.  And lastly, to my family who with out my mom and dad the name Ty Cobb would have been still just a Hall of Famer from Georgia, at least now some people might think about the kid from little Humboldt, IL who grew up just wanting to work in baseball a sport he loves.  THANK YOU EVERYONE!!    

 

 

 

10th Anniversary Celebration of the Ty Cobb Museum

    This blog will solely be about the celebration and life of the greatest baseball player ever to play the game, Tyrus Raymond Cobb.  Whenever anyone speaks of the greatest baseball players such names as Ruth, Aaron, Mays come up, but the one that everyone misses is Cobb.  Not only was Ty Cobb the best baseball player, he also was one of the smartest business men of his time.  To relate it to “Omaha”, Ty Cobb would be the Warren Buffett of his time.  The man new how to sell and make money, investing in products such as Coca-Cola and General Motors.  He was a millionaire who happened to love baseball more than money.   

    People get caught up in stereotypes that he was a dirty player, a racist and a mean person.  But if you read some of the things that happened to him by not only his opponents but his own teammates, then you wouldn’t be nice either.  The man played the game hard taking no friends along the way and that is why many people did and still don’t like him.  He has accomplished things in baseball that players still have not come close to reaching.  Ty Cobb still has the highest career batting average at .367, holds the record for most runs scored, hit over .320 for 23 straight seasons (WOW, that would be my entire life!!), batted over .400 three times, won the batting title 12 times with 9 of them being consecutive years and won the prestigious Triple Crown in 1909!!!  If those stats don’t blow you away then you can email me or write a response and tell me who has better stats.  That is all around stats, not just the most homeruns, and he did it for 24 years.  But the most outstanding stat Ty Cobb accomplished that makes him a unique, special, god-gifted talent would be the number of times he stole home, 35!!!  Just think in your head right now when the last time you saw someone or heard someone steal home?!?!  Ty Cobb did it 35 times in his career and will be a stat that many people will never come close to.

    The Ty Cobb Museum in Royston, GA will be celebrating their 10th Anniversary Celebration of the Ty Cobb Museum July 17-19.  I had a request to come and visit the museum but unfortunately I will be working here in Omaha at the Royals game.  The event is sure to be a special one with a tribute to the life of Ty Cobb and all the special things that he contributed and gave to baseball and baseball’s fans!!  If you are going to be near Royston during the next couple of weeks or near the area ever, I suggest you attend the museum and discover all the things that Ty Cobb accomplished and contributed while he was living.  I know I will be planning a visit to the museum in the near future!!  If you would like more information on the 10th Anniversary Celebration, please visit the Ty Cobb Museum at:  

http://www.tycobbmuseum.org/events.shtml.htm

 

10th_anniversary.jpg

Ty Cobb vs. Orel Hershiser

This week has been a learn as you go type of thing with the CWS being in town.  We had a couple of days off so it would not be so tight and congested around the office and I believe that was a good idea not just cause we got a couple of days off, but it has the possiblity to get loud with everyone talking in a small place, so the fewest amount of people defintaely help that.  We have had many trips around the surrounding area to promote the Royals during the CWS and just get our faces out to community while the Royals are on the road.  The office has been work as usual but it is hard when you can hear the crowds out in the stadium bowl, but you are glad because you know it is packed out there and really hot.

With the College World Series being in town, it kinda of brings past and present baseball all-stars to Omaha.  Recently I had the chance to meet one of the best pitchers in the past 30 years, Orel Hershiser.  I met him while he was exiting one of the games and while I was getting ready to leave the stadium.  He was very kind to stop and wait as we tried to get a few pictures with him.  After the encounter with the former Cy Young winner, I called my mom to tell her the news because she was a big fan of his.  She preceded to tell me that she use to sing in the choir with his wife while she still lived in Mattoon, IL.  

The crazy things that happen and you see at the CWS, it happens to be a small world after all.
Me and Orel.jpg  

CWS vs. Royals

Well the College World Series has arrived and they have taken over our office here at Rosenblatt.  When the NCAA comes in, all of our staff has to squeeze into one area of the stadium and continue to work.  The tough part is that we only have seven games in June at home with the team going on a three week road trip.  The clean-up process was very quick as we had to take all of the Royals memorablia, sponsor signs and seat covers down.  Since the NCAA does not represent professional sports, we had to remove all of our signage so that they could put up all of their teams signage. 

The Royals office is still work as usual, it is just a little different with the games going on outside.  I feel like I should be out there thinking it is a Royals game, but then I remember that it is just the CWS.  I will have to say that the college games are a little boring considering they don’t have Bungee Pulls or Giant Diamond Rolls going on during the innings.  Also they don’t play music during the a-bat which makes the innings drag on. 

As I go through my first CWS, I realize that Minor League Baseball is about the family fun enterntainment plus the baseball game.  While the CWS is more about the baseball game.  That is a big difference and one that each fan should see if they were to go to a Royals game and a CWS game.

AH, nice weather!!!

I don’t know what it is about the weather getting warmer, whether it makes me think about baseball or just being outside doing whatever you do outside.  And as my man Boston Rob just told me, he needs to get outside because his grass is about up to his shins!! “Your gonna need a Bush Hog for that!”  All I know is that it is great that the weather is getting warmer and we are catching some breaks from the bad weather we had last month.  After all the rain outs and postponements, we still had a great April with our average attendace growing 17% from last year.  That is great and it is a combination of everybody in the office that contributes to the success of the Royals. 

The Royals have been in a funk lately with losses coming in bunches.  They were in 1st place when they left for Fresno and have been slumping lately.  I don’t know if they play better baseball with bad weather or what, but I think it is tough going to the nice sunny west coast and then coming back to sub 50 weather in Omaha.  I will have to admit that this past weekend was a beautiful weekend with weather in the upper 80′s!!  I was able to get on the golf course and get some rays and hit some balls which was nice.  It is always good to get on the golf course and hit the ball as hard as you can and see where it goes.  I don’t believe I will have a chance to do that this weekend with the weather going to be in the low 60′s and rainy, but you never know.

The games have been going good, with the pictures from April now up on the main website, oroyals.com!  Get on there and check them out, I would like your input to what else I need to take and if they are good enough to be on there.  There will soon be May photos up there where you can see all of the great things that has happened so far in the month of May.

One of the coolest things I have done this year happened last night during the game.  We were playing the Iowa Cubs and some of the front office staff of the Kansas City Royals were in town.  Well one of the t.v. stations wanted an interview, and I had to make sure that it happened so I had to check on them to see how things were going and if the interview went well.  It happened to be that Dayton Moore was in town who is the GM of the Kansas City Royals and if you don’t know anything about Dayton, he is one of the smartest and youngest GM’s in Major League Baseball and was a important part for the decade success of the Atlanta Braves.  He is now taking the Kansas City Royals to power with his procedures and protocols which will make the Royals a dominant force in the American League.  Well I had a chance to speak with him and check on how him and rest of the staff were doing.  I didn’t want to bother them with the game going on so I just introduced myself and told them to get with me if they needed anything and turned and was going to walk out.  He stopped me and wanted to know if I had visited Ty Cobb’s hometown in Georgia and if I had ever been down in that area.  It was a nice short conversation that I had with Dayton about Ty Cobb and it was awesome to just be talking with one of the smartest baseball people I have learned about.  Hopefully I will have more oppurtunities to chat with him and maybe in the future, work under him.  You have to love this warm weather, you never know what’s going to happen!! 

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